Exercise Choosing a Personal Trainer

personal trainer.

Many people find choosing a personal trainer to be an overwhelming experience. There’s certainly no shortage of trainers available these days, with gyms and in-home trainers around every corner in most big cities. In this article, we break down some of the best ways to choose the right trainer for you.

What are your goals?

First step – you need to write down and outline exactly why you want a personal trainer to assist you with your goals. Is it for weight-loss? Do you want to build strength? Are you trying to rehab an injury? These are the most important questions to ask yourself, as then you’ll know what credentials to ask for with your trainer. Not all trainers are created equal, so you’ll need to¬† identify exactly what their skills are based on your goals.

Does their personality match with yours?

Ok, so having a trainer with a good personality isn’t going to help you with your squats, but it certainly will help you maintain discipline and make the experience more enjoyable. Half the battle is staying motivated, that’s the most important job of any personal trainer. Find someone that is motivating and friendly, but will push you hard. You’ll want that happy medium – you don’t want a trainer that chats the session away either!

Are they insured?

I know this seems like strange criteria for finding a good personal trainer, but you’d be surprised how many trainers there are without insurance coverage. What if you were to get injured or something else happen during a session? It happens more often than you think, so you’ll want to play it as safe as possible. PT’s that are insured are more likely to prioritize your safety during the sessions.

Do they care about you?

Are they punctual? Do they provide you with helpful advice outside of your sessions? Do they cut the sessions short or end them the second the hour is up? There are many ways to identify if your trainer is in it for the right reasons, or if they are just using it as a means to pay off their college tuition. Ask your PT if they chose fitness as a long-term career. If not, then it might be a good idea to move on to someone who wants to invest in their career for the long run. They don’t have to be experienced professionals with many years under their belt. You can find many excellent PT’s that are Kinesiology students or have Fitness and Health Promotion certificates.

Don’t look for just one aspect in finding a personal trainer. Take a multi-varied approach and do your¬†research. Many companies offer free trials- take them up on it. Your health and goals are important, and it may take some time to find the right one for you, but it will be worth it in the end.

What do you think?